Gal A. Kaminka's Publications

Sorted by DateClassified by Publication TypeClassified by TopicGrouped by Student (current)Grouped by Former Students

A Programming Language and Compiler for Molecular Robot Swarm in Biomedical Applications

Inbal Wiesel-Kapah. A Programming Language and Compiler for Molecular Robot Swarm in Biomedical Applications. Master's Thesis, Bar Ilan University,2016.

Download

[PDF]5.7MB  

Abstract

The development of new drugs and treatments is one of the fundamental activities in medicine. The main challenge is to translate medical knowledge to a drug that treats a medical condition. This process is long and complex, much because of the different areas of expertise that are required to produce a drug: physiological knowledge about the disease or condition being treated, medical ideas about possible remedies (in the sense of how to fundamentally address the condition), chemical and biological knowledge of how these remedies can be implemented in the form of drug or treatment, and the testing of those to verify their safety. Recently, molecular robots on the nanometer scale (nanobots) have been proposed to alleviate the complexity of this task. Nanobots deliver compounds to specific targets in the body, without worrying about side-effects and long testing periods. However, every nanobot must be designed by an expert, for the specific case. Complex procedures, or those requiring complex targeting, lead to prohibitively complex nanobot designs. Instead, we advocate an approach where a mixture (cocktail) of heterogeneous simple nanobots carries out complex tasks. We present Tolkien, a novel framework for programing biomedical nanobots, by synthesizing heterogeneous nanobot mixtures from on high-level biomedical programming code, and generic nanobot designs that can be specialized, e.g., for specific payloads. Specifically, we present the Athelas rule-based programming language (for describing medical procedures), and the Bilbo compiler that transforms Athelas programs into combinations of specialized nanobots, that together execute the procedures prescribed.

Additional Information

BibTeX

@MastersThesis{wiesel-msc,
author = {Inbal Wiesel-Kapah},
title = {A Programming Language and Compiler for Molecular Robot Swarm in Biomedical Applications},
school = {{B}ar {I}lan {U}niversity},
year = {2016},
OPTkey = {},
OPTtype = {},
OPTaddress = {},
OPTmonth = {},
OPTnote = {Available at \url{http://www.cs.biu.ac.il/~galk/Publications/b2hd-wiesel-msc.html}},
OPTannote = {},
  wwwnote = {}, 
  abstract = {The development of new drugs and treatments is one of the fundamental activities in medicine. 
The main challenge is to translate medical knowledge to a drug that treats a medical condition. 
This process is long and complex, much because of the different areas of expertise that are required to 
produce a drug: physiological knowledge about the disease or condition being treated, 
medical ideas about possible remedies (in the sense of how to fundamentally address the condition), 
chemical and biological knowledge of how these remedies can be implemented in the form 
of drug or treatment, and the testing of those to verify their safety. Recently, molecular robots 
on the nanometer scale (nanobots) have been proposed to alleviate the complexity of this task. 
Nanobots deliver compounds to specific targets in the body, without worrying about side-effects 
and long testing periods. However, every nanobot must be designed by an expert, for the specific 
case. Complex procedures, or those requiring complex targeting, lead to prohibitively complex 
nanobot designs. Instead, we advocate an approach where a mixture (cocktail) of heterogeneous 
simple nanobots carries out complex tasks. We present Tolkien, a novel framework for programing 
biomedical nanobots, by synthesizing heterogeneous nanobot mixtures from on high-level biomedical 
programming code, and generic nanobot designs that can be specialized, e.g., for specific 
payloads. Specifically, we present the Athelas rule-based programming language (for describing 
medical procedures), and the Bilbo compiler that transforms Athelas programs into combinations 
of specialized nanobots, that together execute the procedures prescribed. },
}

Generated by bib2html.pl (written by Patrick Riley ) on Sat Feb 24, 2018 00:31:02